MARILYN
BURNS
MATH ARTICLES

Using Math Menus

Giving students a menu of activities to choose from helps differentiate instruction and engage all learners.


October 2016
Uncovering the Math Curriculum

Too often, mathematics instruction gives students the erroneous notion that learning math is all about learning procedures, rather than making sense of ideas.


October 2014
Go Figure: Math and the Common Core

The Common Core State Standards for Mathematical Practice will require teachers to strengthen students’ numerical reasoning and mental math skills.


Dec 2012/Jan 2013
Snapshots of Student Misunderstandings

To find out what students really understand about that math lesson, try one-on-one interviews – and be ready for some surprises.


February 2010
Win-Win Math Games

Games can motivate students, capture their interest, and are a great way to get in that paper-and-pencil practice.


March/April 2009
Nine Ways to Catch Kids Up

How do we help floundering students who lack basic math concepts?


November 2007
Marilyn Burns: Mental Math

Figuring out answers in our heads is an important skill. Give it a starring role in your math teaching.


March/April 2007
Marilyn Burns on the Language of Math

Parlez-vous geometry? Sprechen sie fractions? An expert’s guide to teaching math’s unique vocabulary.


April 2006
Building a Teaching Bridge from Reading to Math

I’m convinced that one of the greatest challenges at the elementary level is teachers’ content knowledge.


Winter 2005
Looking at How Students Reason

Mathematics teachers gain a wealth of information by delving into the thinking behind students’ answers, not just when answers are wrong but also when they are correct.


November 2005
The Building Blocks of Math

My favorite ways to teach addition and subtraction in the early grades.


October/November 2005
3 Lessons by Marilyn Burns: Using Storybooks to Teach Math

For many of us, the storybook shelf isn’t the first place we go to when we start to plan a math lesson. But children’s books can be a great math teaching tool.


April 2005
Marilyn Burns Talks About Today’s Classroom

In this series of three articles, developed from an interview, Marilyn Burns shares her ideas about helping children learn in the math classroom; talks about how teachers can learn to really understand mathematics; and suggest ways to help parents understand the role of the NCTM Standards in the classroom.


April 2005
A Can of Coke Leads to a Piece of PI

A professional development exercise for educators is an adaptable math lesson for many grades.


Fall 2004
Writing in Math

Innovative teachers can make writing an invaluable part of math instruction.


October 2004
10 Big Math Ideas

Here are ten “big ideas” I now embrace for helping children learn, understand, and enjoy math class.


April 2004
Q & A with Marilyn Burns

Here are Marilyn’s answers to your most frequently asked questions.


April 2002
Algebra in the Elementary Grades? Absolutely!

Algebra is now second in importance after number and operations, even for elementary students.


October 2002
Math Journals Boost Real Learning

How words can help your students with numbers.


April 2001
Making Sense of the Math Standards

Marilyn Burns shows you how to put the new standards into perspective – and into practice.


March/April 2000
Tackling the Third R

Marilyn Burns shares her secrets for teaching arithmetic.


March/April 1999
Can I Balance Arithmetic Instruction with Real-Life Math?

Marilyn outlines why it’s important to teach arithmetic and shows you how to match what you’re teaching with children’s real-world needs.


April 1998
How I Boost My Students’ Number Sense

It’s not as tough as you think! Try these strategies.


April 1997
How to Make the Most of Math Manipulatives

A fresh look at getting students’ heads–and hands!–around math concepts.


April 1996
Writing in Math Class? Absolutely!

How to enhance students’ mathematical understanding while reinforcing their writing skills.


April 1995
Arithmetic: The Last Holdout

Ms. Burns urges mathematics teachers to stop teaching standard algorithms and to start having children invent their own methods. She also explores, along the way, some of the ramifications of this major change in arithmetic instruction.


February 1994